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Home Anglers Corner
Anglers Corner

catboy

Have you made a recent fishing trip to Lake Powell? If you have, please let us know how you did.  Post your fishing report on the Fishing Message Board or send it to Wayne Gustaveson ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) via E-mail.  Please include who you are and where you are from, dates fished, location, tackle used, species and number of fish caught and any other information you would like to pass on to other anglers.

Our goal here is to save shad by encouraging harvest of striped bass and walleye.  If we do that then all fisheries benefit from the effort.

Keep the reports coming.  I send out high resolution pictures to the media with my weekly fish reports.  If you have a good photo and would like it to be displayed in newspapers and magazines then send it to me.   Be aware that your photo may be used in other locations.

If possible send, first and last name, and hometown. The media likes pictures of kids (include age) and fishergirls. Be creative when taking photos. Change poses and backgrounds. Use the flash in full sun to avoid hat shadow.

If you have a general question try posting on WAYNESWORDS FISHING MESSAGE BOARD.  Thanks to Bartsplace for putting the new message board in place so we can all commiunicate in real time with hot fish reports. 



April 16, 2018 - Escalante Stripers

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We headed down to Bullfrog on Friday night, spent the night in the Defiance House Lodge before getting up Saturday morning and making the long trek to the Escalante. While heading down the main channel we were lucky enough to catch an otter cruising across the main channel near Iceberg Canyon and watched him for a bit. My boys thought that was pretty cool. Once in the Escalante, we headed to the back of the canyon until we hit muddy water. We then trolled until we started picking up stripers which didn't take long. We were finding fish on the sonar around 15-25 feet and had great success using deep diving walleye runners--blue, white, and black/white seemed to work best. We also spent a little bit of time dropping spoons on schools which worked well too. But, mostly we trolled and when a fish was hooked up, we would cast behind the boat and often pick up another. We had many doubles and it got to the point where my two boys--ages 4 and 7--were fighting over who would hook up first. My youngest boy would always start crying if his older brother landed a fish and he didn't. By the time we left--we arrived around 10:30 and left around 5--we had boated around 40 stripers and one walleye.
On Sunday, we headed over to Halls Creek because I don't think the kids would have handled the long trek back to the Escalante. We had a more difficult time finding colored water in Halls Creek and tried trolling a bit in the back, but found very few fish marks. We looked also at the mouth of Halls and found no fish. So, we headed down to Lake Canyon and found some colored water in the back of Lake Canyon and started marking fish. I dropped a bottom bouncer looking for some walleye or crappie or blue gill and immediately hooked up before losing it without seeing what I had. So, I tried dropping it again and never had another strike. After messing around a bit with the bottom bouncers, we switched and tried trolling and saw a lot of good marks on the sonar but only had one hook up that broke my boy off. Other than that, nothing in Lake Canyon either.
Because the boys were bored with the lack of fish on Sunday, we headed up to Lost Eden and let the boys check out the alcoves before heading back to the marina and home. IN all, the weekend was a success, and the boys had a ball landing stripers. It seemed pretty obvious to us that the colored/stained water was best...

We headed down to Bullfrog on Friday night, spent the night in the Defiance House Lodge before getting up Saturday morning and making the long trek to the Escalante. While heading down the main channel we were lucky enough to catch an otter cruising across the main channel near Iceberg Canyon and watched him for a bit. My boys thought that was pretty cool. Once in the Escalante, we headed to the back of the canyon until we hit muddy water. We then trolled until we started picking up stripers which didn't take long. We were finding fish on the sonar around 15-25 feet and had great success using deep diving walleye runners--blue, white, and black/white seemed to work best. We also spent a little bit of time dropping spoons on schools which worked well too. But, mostly we trolled and when a fish was hooked up, we would cast behind the boat and often pick up another. We had many doubles and it got to the point where my two boys--ages 4 and 7--were fighting over who would hook up first. My youngest boy would always start crying if his older brother landed a fish and he didn't. By the time we left--we arrived around 10:30 and left around 5--we had boated around 40 stripers and one walleye.

On Sunday, we headed over to Halls Creek because I don't think the kids would have handled the long trek back to the Escalante. We had a more difficult time finding colored water in Halls Creek and tried trolling a bit in the back, but found very few fish marks. We looked also at the mouth of Halls and found no fish. So, we headed down to Lake Canyon and found some colored water in the back of Lake Canyon and started marking fish. I dropped a bottom bouncer looking for some walleye or crappie or blue gill and immediately hooked up before losing it without seeing what I had. So, I tried dropping it again and never had another strike. After messing around a bit with the bottom bouncers, we switched and tried trolling and saw a lot of good marks on the sonar but only had one hook up that broke my boy off. Other than that, nothing in Lake Canyon either.

Because the boys were bored with the lack of fish on Sunday, we headed up to Lost Eden and let the boys check out the alcoves before heading back to the marina and home. IN all, the weekend was a success, and the boys had a ball landing stripers. It seemed pretty obvious to us that the colored/stained water was best...

 

April 3, 2018 - Stripers at Dam and Intake

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Had a great time out on the lake ! Tried my best at bass fishing with no luck. Saw a lot of large mouth up shallow maybe looking for beds. Water temp ranged from 57-63. Did get into the stripers down next to damn and by he power plant outlet thing. Maybe 20 total. Talked with a guy that did very well on the crappie . He said he caught 20-30 off beds back up into some canyons . Thanks for the tips!  Talk with you next time .
Zach


Had a great time out on the lake ! Tried my best at bass fishing with no luck. Saw a lot of largemouth up shallow maybe looking for beds. Water temp ranged from 57-63. Did get into the stripers down next to dam and by the power plant intake. Maybe 20 total. Talked with a guy that did very well on the crappie. He said he caught 20-30 off beds back up into some canyons. Thanks for the tips!   Zach

zlashely2

 

lashley1

 

 

April 3, 2018 - Bass in Warm Creek

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Wayne, hope all is well. With the worst case of spring fever either of us have ever experienced, my 11 year old son and I made the the 2 hour drive from flagstaff for a day of fishing. We were well aware that current water temps were a bit on the low side, but with the current forecast, we were hoping to find some warmer afternoon water. We started the morning in Whaweap, as expected, fishing was slow, landing only a handful of smallmouth and one super skinny striper. On the bright side, all the smallmouth ranged between 2-3 lbs. Water temps in Wahweap ranged from 53° to 56°.After making the rounds in Whaweap, we made our way into warmcreek. To our surprise, the water temps were much warmer, by late afternoon we were fishing water 59°- 62°.Fishing markedly improved. With our trusty tube jigs and single tail hula grubs, we managed to boat 12 healthy smallmouth and a single 2 lb large mouth in the final hour before our departure for the high country. As we trailered the boat, we felt only slight disappointment that our brief day trip had come to an end, instead our conversation and thoughts were consumed with hard fighting smallmouth and planning our next trip.
Thank you for all your work. With information provided by you and the Lake Powell fishing community, my son has developed a passion for angling, boating and Lake Powell that will last a lifetime. Priceless.

With the worst case of spring fever either of us have ever experienced, my 11 year old son and I made the the 2 hour drive from flagstaff for a day of fishing. We were well aware that current water temps were a bit on the low side, but with the current forecast, we were hoping to find some warmer afternoon water. We started the morning in Wahweap, as expected, fishing was slow, landing only a handful of smallmouth and one super skinny striper. On the bright side, all the smallmouth ranged between 2-3 lbs. Water temps in Wahweap ranged from 53° to 56°.

After making the rounds in Wahweap, we made our way into Warm Creek. To our surprise, the water temps were much warmer, by late afternoon we were fishing water 59°- 62°. Fishing markedly improved. With our trusty tube jigs and single tail hula grubs, we managed to boat 12 healthy smallmouth and a single 2 lb large mouth in the final hour before our departure for the high country. As we trailered the boat, we felt only slight disappointment that our brief day trip had come to an end, instead our conversation and thoughts were consumed with hard fighting smallmouth and planning our next trip.

Thank you for all your work. With information provided by you and the Lake Powell fishing community, my son has developed a passion for angling, boating and Lake Powell that will last a lifetime. Priceless.

romeroson_edited-1

 

romero2

 

April 3, 2018 - Bass and Crappie

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This is Bob Lemons.  I just signed up as a member on your website and will be posting in the future under the screen name of, "Fursniper."   I will be fishing  very frequently between now and the end of May and will provide results of my trips on the message board.  Here is the info from my most recent fishing trip.
I fished 2 days near the back of Last Chance on March 28-29 with Ron Chapman from Page.
First day  we landed 2 crappie, 1 largemouth, 1 smallmouth, and 1 striper.  We fished hard from 1030am to 5:30pm.
Second day we fished the same places and landed 3 crappie and 3 smallmouth.  We left Last Chance around 5pm and stopped along the east wall of Padre Bay and caught 2 more smallmouth there.  We fished hard from 10am to 6pm.
Water surface temp stayed consistent at 58*F both days.  Our targeted species were LMB, SMB, and BC.  We were fishing less than 30 feet deep using 1/8 to 1/4 ounce jigs that were either chartreuse, smoke with silver flake, or pumpkin colored.  We had to work a lot of shoreline to catch these.  Overall, we landed 13 fish consisting of 4 different species in 2 days.
Here are the photos.
This is Ron Chapman. He has lived in Page since 1974 and these are the first crappie he has ever caught in his life.  He actually caught 3 in one day in the back of Last Chance and created a once in a lifetime memory....LOL!

This is Bob Lemons.  I just signed up as a member on your website and will be posting in the future under the screen name of, "Fursniper."   I will be fishing  very frequently between now and the end of May and will provide results of my trips on the message board.  Here is the info from my most recent fishing trip.


I fished 2 days near the back of Last Chance on March 28-29 with Ron Chapman from Page. 
First day  we landed 2 crappie, 1 largemouth, 1 smallmouth, and 1 striper.  We fished hard from 1030am to 5:30pm.

Second day we fished the same places and landed 3 crappie and 3 smallmouth.  We left Last Chance around 5pm and stopped along the east wall of Padre Bay and caught 2 more smallmouth there.  We fished hard from 10am to 6pm.  
Water surface temp stayed consistent at 58*F both days.  Our targeted species were LMB, SMB, and BC.  We were fishing less than 30 feet deep using 1/8 to 1/4 ounce jigs that were either chartreuse, smoke with silver flake, or pumpkin colored.  We had to work a lot of shoreline to catch these.  Overall, we landed 13 fish consisting of 4 different species in 2 days.

Here are the photos.

This is Ron Chapman. He has lived in Page since 1974 and these are the first crappie he has ever caught in his life.  He actually caught 3 in one day in the back of Last Chance and created a once in a lifetime memory....LOL!-

rchapmanbc

 

rchapmansmb

 

March 21, 2018 - Hite Stripers

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We made it in and out from Hite, definitely not possible from Farley. The fishing was pretty steady through the mornings, slow through early afternoon, but picked up again before sun down, trolling mostly with lead line and/or down riggers.
Happy fishing!

We launched in and out from Hite.  It was definitely not possible from Farley this weekend. The fishing was pretty steady for stripers through the mornings, slow through early afternoon, but picked up again before sun down, trolling mostly with lead line and/or down riggers. Happy fishing!

carlkelly

 

 

February 16, 2018 - Bullfrog bait

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Wayne, I thought I would pass along what I did and learned the night of 16 Feb 2018.  I tried fishing
under the lights at Halls Marina without even a bite for around 2 hours of effort.  Thinking about your
report that the stripers are staying out of the channel and have been found back in the coves and
shallower areas, I went to the cove that has the fuel pumps just downstream from the marina, knowing the bottom is only 50' or so deep, and got action almost immediately.  For some reason I was having
a hard time hooking the fish, but for an hour or more I had occasional bites.  I netted 2 stripers between 2 and 3 pounds each that put up a good fight, and were nice and fat.  We ate them and they were some of the tastiest we have had.  I caught them on anchovies.  I tried out corn, now that it is
allowed at Powell, and only had one bite, that never hooked at all.  So far I'm not very excited about
the corn, but that may change with warmer weather.  It was pretty cold so I didn't stay long, but it
seems like there are stripers for the taking if a person tries the right place, and the right lures or bait.
Ralph (Reddrock) from Blanding

I thought I would pass along what I did and learned the night of 16 Feb 2018.  I tried fishing under the lights at Halls Marina without even a bite for around 2 hours of effort.  Thinking about your report that the stripers are staying out of the channel and have been found back in the coves and shallower areas, I went to the cove that has the fuel pumps just downstream from the marina, knowing the bottom is only 50' or so deep, and got action almost immediately. 

For some reason I was havinga hard time hooking the fish, but for an hour or more I had occasional bites.  I netted 2 stripers between 2 and 3 pounds each that put up a good fight, and were nice and fat.  We ate them and they were some of the tastiest we have had.  I caught them on anchovies.  I tried out corn, now that it is allowed at Powell, and only had one bite, that never hooked at all.  So far I'm not very excited about the corn, but that may change with warmer weather.  It was pretty cold so I didn't stay long, but it seems like there are stripers for the taking if a person tries the right place, and the right lures or bait. 

Ralph (Reddrock) from Blanding

 

October 16, 2017 - Knowles to Blue Notch

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Scott, Mike, Steve and Steve fished Friday afternoon Oct. 13th   to Monday afternoon Oct 16th.  Water temperature varied from 64 to 70.  Smallmouth fishing was most consistent ( especially in Red Canyon ): catching on casted jig heads with most any color worm or trolling with medium divers in 10 -> 15 feet.  We did catch the most smallmouth on points near entrances to canyons.  We did notice what other few boats we saw were focused on these points as well. This was true from Knowles to Blue Notch.
On Sunday we ventured up North, ( after staying close to Blue Notch Saturday the 14th when the wind came up early and stayed up all day ).  We visited Striper City and Two Mile early in the morning to limited success ( 7:30 -> 10:00 ).  Certainly there were plenty of bait fish present in the back of  Two Mile.  The entrance to White showed numerous bait fish and sport fish in 20 feet of water.  From 11:00 until 2:00: Trolling in Farley ( about 2/3 of the way back ) and White ( around Battleship ) produced 13 stripers and 4 walleye using medium and deep divers:  from 5 to 15 feet.  All were very healthy and fat.  Water temperature that day was 64.
On Monday we fished Knowles, Tapestry Wall and Cedar:  we graphed very few bait fish except for the back of the Cedar canyon and caught only a few small mouth and large mouth of the very small variety, and no striper sitings.
Pictures:
Mike with Smallmouth taken by casting a jig head with watermelon worm at Tapestry wall.
Scott with Walleye taken on Shad colored deep diver casting to the shore in 20 feet of water at the entrance to Blue Notch.

Scott, Mike, Steve and Steve fished Friday afternoon Oct. 13th   to Monday afternoon Oct 16th.  Water temperature varied from 64 to 70.  Smallmouth fishing was most consistent ( especially in Red Canyon ): catching on casted jig heads with most any color worm or trolling with medium divers in 10 -> 15 feet.  We did catch the most smallmouth on points near entrances to canyons.  We did notice what other few boats we saw were focused on these points as well. This was true from Knowles to Blue Notch.

On Sunday we ventured up North, ( after staying close to Blue Notch Saturday the 14th when the wind came up early and stayed up all day ).  We visited Striper City and Two Mile early in the morning to limited success ( 7:30 -> 10:00 ).  Certainly there were plenty of bait fish present in the back of  Two Mile.  The entrance to White showed numerous bait fish and sport fish in 20 feet of water.  From 11:00 until 2:00: Trolling in Farley ( about 2/3 of the way back ) and White ( around Battleship ) produced 13 stripers and 4 walleye using medium and deep divers:  from 5 to 15 feet.  All were very healthy and fat.  Water temperature that day was 64.

On Monday we fished Knowles, Tapestry Wall and Cedar:  we graphed very few bait fish except for the back of the Cedar canyon and caught only a few small mouth and large mouth of the very small variety, and no striper sitings.   

Pictures:          Mike with Smallmouth taken by casting a jig head with watermelon worm at Tapestry wall.       

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Scott with Walleye taken on Shad colored deep diver casting to the shore in 20 feet of water at the entrance to Blue Notch.

 

svoigt

 

October 29, 2017 - SMB pattern

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There is no doubt Lake Powell smallmouth are not following their typical fall pattern. Most years they follow the shad migration into the backs of the canyons and large coves. They stack up in large numbers in relatively small areas making it possible at times to catch 15 to 20 without moving the boat. Except for one day in late September, that’s not been the case for me this year, and last week’s trip was typical of this fall’s pattern. Longtime fishing partner John Conrad and I managed to catch exactly 100 smallmouths in three days last week, a good catch in most places but definitely not up to Lake Powell standards for October. We were never able to find large concentrations of smallmouths in any one area. They were scattered all over the place.

 

On Tuesday and most of Wednesday John  and I fished in and around five different coves in Last Chance Bay. Late Wednesday and all day Thursday we fished some smaller coves and ledges off the main channel just below Gregory Butte. Fishing success was about the same everywhere we fished. We normally did not catch more than two or three fish from one spot. The one exception was one small cove off the main channel south of Gregory Butte where we caught five nice smallmouths Wednesday afternoon and six more Thursday morning. We did not enjoy that kind of success anywhere else. We also found that we would have good action in the early morning, but then things would grind to a halt around 10 a.m. picking up again around noon. This occurred all three days.

 

One thing that was very consistent was the kind of structure and depth where we found them. Our most consistent pattern was to find an area where the bottom dropped from five to eight feet down to 12 to 15 feet. The bass would be right at the base of that first drop off. While we caught a few fish up shallower and some considerably deeper, a vast majority of our catch came right off that first drop at 12 to 15 feet. Another thing we found was this fish did not appear desperate to eat. Most of the time during the fall Lake Powell smallmouth feed frantically storing up fat for the winter. That did not appear to be the case on this trip, at least not during daylight hours. While they would not refuse a lure placed right in their strike zone, they were not willing to chase anything. A soft plastic bait placed right in front of them was the best presentation. I tried throwing topwater quite a bit but only got a couple half-hearted strikes. These fish seemed content to just wait for something to swim or crawl into their strike zone and were not willing to chase.

 

The best part of the trip, besides the beautiful weather, was the average size of the smallmouths we caught were considerable larger than most years. We caught very few dinks, and not all that many 11-inch “eaters.” Most of the fish we caught were between 13 and 17 inches, and they were fatter and heavier for their size than any smallmouths I’ve ever seen on this lake. John was also impressed with the size and health of these fish. I believe that is why they were not so desperate to feed. There appears to be a lot of forage in the lake, and they’ve eaten very well all summer. There is no doubt that well-fed fat fish are usually harder to catch than those who are not so well fed. Most of the fish we caught in Last Chance were feeding on shad, however the ones we caught off the main channel below Gregory Butte appeared to be eating primarily crayfish. This goes to show that Lake Powell smallmouths are equal opportunity predators. I will say that these fish fought harder than any smallmouths I’ve ever caught on this lake - another sign of their good health.

 

While things could change over the next week or so, it would be my suggestion to concentrate bass fishing efforts in and around the smaller coves off the main channel and in the fronts of the big coves in the large bays like Last Chance. If that is not successful them move towards the backs of the coves. Be prepared to cover a lot of water as the fish do not appear to be concentrated in any one area. Start looking in the 12 to 15-foot range off the first drop off, but be prepared to fish both shallower and deeper if necessary.

 

This concludes my Lake Powell fishing season for 2017. All in all it was another incredibly successful year. I had two of my best fishing days ever on the lake this year and never really had an unsuccessful trip. I thank God for allowing me the privilege of fishing this wonderful lake all these years and pray I will be able to do so for many years to come.

 

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October 26, 2017 - GHB bass

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Just a quick note to let you know we’ve been doing some good fishing in Good Hope Bay. This is just one of many nice Smallmouth we’ve landed. Some decent Largemouth as well. We generally fish with Yamamoto shad shaped worms or single curly tail on a colored jig head. Many were caught on Natural Shad color on this four-day trip. FYI we generally do not look for, nor fish for Stripers... just the green fish. Cousin Bob and I hope to get down one more time this fall. Just thought I’d share.

markmoebius

 

 

October 16, 2017 = Last Chance Bass

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 edlc3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Chance Bay is my absolute favorite fishing spot on Lake Powell. It is usually full of smallmouth bass, my favorite fishing quarry, and it’s beautiful - the most beautiful spot in the lower lake in my opinion. If the weather forecast is good and I’m up to it, that’s where I’m going.

Last Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday the weather forecast was good, and I was up to it. Joining me once again on this trip was longtime fishing partner John Conrad of Prescott. I never have any problem convincing John that Last Chance is the place to go as he feels the same about it as I do. He was all in on making the run up there all three days. Of course our catching 91 fish in a day there two weeks prior helped stoke our enthusiasm. I’ve had more of those kinds of days at Last Chance than anywhere else in the lower lake.

A dry cold front had moved through on Monday, and Tuesday dawned as a typical post-front bluebird day. It was cold when we arrived at the Wahweap launch ramp. John and I agreed the fishing might be a bit tough, and we were right. We didn’t catch a fish for the first two hours. Finally we caught a couple small bass in the cove that had been so productive for us two weeks earlier, but that was it for another hour or so. Finally around 11:00 a.m. we started picking up a smallmouth here and there, including some pretty good sized ones, and fishing got much better as the day went on. We finished with 30 smallies, a good day in most places but below average for Lake Powell in October.

With stable weather predicted for Wednesday we decided to return to Last Chance. We got into fish immediately and caught 12 in the first hour. Convinced the post-front blues were over we looked forward to the rest of the day. However things suddenly stopped and we didn’t land a fish for over an hour. Staying in the same cove all day, we fished completely around the back end, including both forks taking a smallmouth here and there, however after that initial burst, we never really hit a good pattern. It was around 11:30 a.m. and we were about ready to move to another spot, however I suggested we fish along the north bank a ways before leaving. That turned out to be a good decision as we immediately starting catching smallmouths, sometimes two at a time, including some really decent fish. We spent the rest of the day fishing that bank all the way out to the mouth of cove. When we headed back for Wahweap Bay we had tallied 63 smallmouths and one small green bass. This was more like October fishing on Lake Powell.

After a couple days of stable weather I thought the fishing would be even better on Thursday, and Last Chance was once again the place to go. The way things started this appeared to be the case as we were immediately into some nice smallmouth. We took 10 in the first hour, and then things shut down. We went back to the spot where we’d had so much success two weeks before, however the results were not much better there than Tuesday. We moved to a large cove I’d not fished at all this year and took a few fish, including several very nice ones, but the action was slow. Finally around 1:00 p.m. we went back to the bank where we’d had so much success Wednesday. The smallies were still there and still willing as we had the fastest action of the day. We finished the day with 34 smallmouths and two largemouths. Although our total was much smaller than the day before, the average size fish we took was much larger with several going around two pounds. Our three-day total was 127 smallmouths and three largemouths. We took no stripers or walleyes.

Although we caught fewer fish than on some previous trips, as I mentioned earlier the average size was quite a bit larger. These fish were really healthy and carried more weight for their length than any Lake Powell smallmouth I’ve seen in some 23 years of fishing. They fought very hard often leaping several feet out of the water. The primary forage was definitely shad with many hooked fish spitting out shad as we fought them. A few of the fish we kept and cleaned and crayfish in their stomachs, but a vast majority were stuffed full of shad. 

Despite so many being full of shad, we saw very little surface activity. Most of the fish we caught were 10 to 15 feet deep, however we caught a few between 20 and 30 feet. We caught very few fishing vertically directly below the boat. Horizontal casting was the better presentation. We caught many more fish on slick rock ledges than broken rock bottoms. While I’ve taken smallmouths on slick rock in the past, I’ve never taken so many as on this trip. Although most of the fish we caught were shallow, we always caught them close to deep water. In fact, a number of smallmouths we landed were icy cold to touch suggesting they had just come up out of deeper water.

We experienced a very bright moon all three nights before our fishing days. John and I believe that the bass had fed all night which may explain why we didn’t generally do well in the mornings. It also may explain why we didn’t see much feeding activity. The only presentation that consistently caught fish was as slow as possible - a lot of very slow dragging and dead sticking. We used our usual drop shot setups with Yamamoto Shad Shaped Worms. Our best color was the green and white laminate, although the natural shad color was also effective. As with previous trips, i don’t think color or even the lure type was very important. Putting the bait in front of the fish’s nose and keeping it there was important. Although we had a lot of strikes on the initial drop, which is often the case with drop shotting, we had an equal number on the slow drag or while dead sticking. During daylight hours it did not appear these fish were willing to chase. 

It was also apparent to us that there weren’t as many bass in the backs of the coves as we normally see this time of year. In fact, there appeared to be many more two weeks ago. Monday’s cold front might have pushed quite of few of them out to deeper water and perhaps some were just moving back in. I can’t say for sure if that was the case, but it is a possibility. Nevertheless it was still a good fishing trip highlighted by beautiful weather and the spectacular scenery of Last Chance Bay. John and I hope to duplicate all of this next week in our final fishing trip of the year.

 

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