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Fishing Report

Water temperature:

80-85 F

June 26, 2015



June 30, 2015 - It's HOT!

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Lake Powell Fish Report – June 24, 2015
Lake Elevation: 3613
Water Temperature 82 - 85 F
By: Wayne Gustaveson   http://www.wayneswords.com
Lake Powell is red hot!
The water surface temperature is well over 80 degrees first thing in the morning.  The air temperature is well over 100 degrees each day.  The air cools off into the high 70s after the sun has been down for a long time at night.  The wind is mostly calm.  All of this explains why so many boaters, swimmers, campers and recreationist love the lake in July.  What a great place to be!
Anglers can enjoy the July celebration at the lake right along with the crowd. But there is a window when fishing success is excellent.  The time frame is early morning and late evening.  Largemouth and smallmouth bass are very aggressive and easy to catch on topwater lures, shallow running crankbaits and weightless wacky rigged senkos. The time to start fishing is when the sun begins to light up the eastern sky between 4-5 AM (MST).  Fishing is great until about 7 AM when bass blink at the sun and move back into the brush or slip into the depths.
Evening bass fishing gets good again as the sun settles low in the west. Again topwater and crankbaits cast close to the brushy shoreline are the best bet. Sunfish have found shelter in the freshly flooded green brush and old tumbleweed piles that are now underwater. Largemouth bass live in the brush with the sunfish and smallmouth bass are in deeper water not far away so they can make a quick trip into the brush for a meal.
Bass fishing is steady all day long. Just cast plastic grubs to shallow reefs or quick falling slick rock slopes and points to find bass eagerly awaiting a forage fish swim by.  There is no question that bass fishing provides the best success right now. To catch a lot of fish, target smallmouth bass.
Striped bass are not slurping/boiling as much this week as they have during most of June. From their behavior today it seems that the supply of small shad has lessened.  Where big slurping groups were seen last week there are now only very small groups or individual stripers working the surface in the early morning in the southern lake. It is probably only a coincidence but declining surface action in the south usually means improving surface feeding in the northern lake.
The best surface action seen this week is in the evening.  Watch for a quick boil of larger 18-20 inch stripers, in the main channel or main canyon as the sun sets in the evening.
During the daylight hours the most consistent striper technique is trolling along the shallow sloping shoreline where bottom depth is 25-30 feet. Trolling results are steady for 18-inch.  Target rocky points and reefs and troll along the 25-foot bottom depth strata with medium depth crankbaits.  Remember to drop a spoon to the bottom or cast a crankbait behind the boat when a stripers is caught trolling.  The other members of his group will be trailing- along behind the hooked fish. It’s a great way to increase the catch rate.
Trolling with 12-foot divers along the 12-foot depth strata still provides some decent walleye success.  Walleye numbers are still above average and catching continues in midsummer. We found today that fast trolling (4-5 MPH) for stripers resulted in an occasional walleye when the lure passed near a bush or some other likely walleye hangout.
Fishing is still good and you can cool off by swimming with the fishes when you get hot.

Lake Powell Fish Report – June 24, 2015

Lake Elevation: 3613

Water Temperature 82 - 85 F

By: Wayne Gustaveson   http://www.wayneswords.com

Lake Powell is Red Hot!

hotwheelThe water surface temperature is well over 80 degrees first thing in the morning.  The air temperature is well over 100 degrees each day.  The air cools off into the high 70s after the sun has been down for a long time at night.  The wind is mostly calm.  All of this explains why so many boaters, swimmers, campers and recreationist love the lake in July.  What a great place to be! 

Anglers can enjoy the July celebration at the lake right along with the crowd. But there is a window when fishing success is excellent.  The time frame is early morning and late evening.  Largemouth and smallmouth bass are very aggressive and easy to catch on topwater lures, shallow running crankbaits and weightless wacky rigged senkos. The time to start fishing is when the sun begins to light up the eastern sky between 4-5 AM (MST).  Fishing is great until about 7 AM when bass blink at the sun and move back into the brush or slip into the depths.  

Evening bass fishing gets good again as the sun settles low in the west. Again topwater and crankbaits cast close to the brushy shoreline are the best bet. Sunfish have found shelter in the freshly flooded green brush and old tumbleweed piles that are now underwater. Largemouth bass live in the brush with the sunfish and smallmouth bass are in deeper water not far away so they can make a quick trip into the brush for a meal.  

Bass fishing is steady all day long. Just cast plastic grubs to shallow reefs or quick falling slick rock slopes and points to find bass eagerly awaiting a forage fish swim by.  There is no question that bass fishing provides the best success right now. To catch a lot of fish, target smallmouth bass.

Striped bass are not slurping/boiling as much this week as they have during most of June. From their behavior today it seems that the supply of small shad has lessened.  Where big slurping groups were seen last week there are now only very small groups or individual stripers working the surface in the early morning in the southern lake. It is probably only a coincidence but declining surface action in the south usually means improving surface feeding in the northern lake. 

The best surface action seen this week is in the evening.  Watch for a quick boil of larger 18-20 inch stripers, in the main channel or main canyon as the sun sets in the evening.  

bm3aDuring the daylight hours the most consistent striper technique is trolling along the shallow sloping shoreline where bottom depth is 25-30 feet. Trolling results are steady for 18-inch stripers.  Target rocky points and reefs and troll along the 25-foot bottom depth strata with medium depth crankbaits.  Remember to drop a spoon to the bottom or cast a crankbait behind the boat when a stripers is caught trolling.  The other members of his group will be trailing- along behind the hooked fish. It’s a great way to increase the catch rate. 

Trolling with 12-foot divers along the 12-foot depth strata still provides some decent walleye success.  Walleye numbers are still above average and catching continues in midsummer. We found today that fast trolling (4-5 MPH) for stripers resulted in an occasional walleye when the lure passed near a bush or some other likely walleye hangout. 

Fishing is still good and you can cool off by swimming with the fishes when you get hot.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 30 June 2015 14:37
 

June 24, 2015 - Slurps everwhere

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Lake Powell Fish Report – June 24, 2015
Lake Elevation: 3611
Water Temperature 78 - 83 F
By: Wayne Gustaveson   http://www.wayneswords.com
Slurps, Slurps, Slurps!
Fishing is very exciting now with striped bass popping to the top over the length of the lake.  Catching is sometimes a different story so I am dedicating this report to help you catch more of the fish seen surfacing.
When:  Stripers are looking for three square meals a day. The only thing on the menu is small shad that live close to the surface while searching for plankton to eat.  The first daytime feeding event occurs at first light and lasts until the shade is gone.  The early morning period can be cancelled if the morning breeze roughs up the water surface making it difficult for striper to see the tiny shad in the rolling waves.
The next feeding period is from 9-11 AM (MST). If wind is a factor early then the combined first and second feeding period will begin as soon as the wind lays down allowing stripers to come up.
The last surface feeding event begins at 4 PM (MST) and continues until dark.  This is the best and most consistent feeding period unless afternoon wind spoils the party.
Where: Most of the action seen lately is in the main channel and main canyon areas in clear water. As water clarity improves in the next few weeks the northern lake will be the center of activity. Today the best area is from Bullfrog downstream to Padre Bay.
How:  Slurps are quick but numerous. When the slurp erupts it is critical to quickly get in casting range.  How close is different for each individual depending on how far you can cast with your rod and the lure used.    Regardless of the distance when in range make the first cast count. There may not be time for a second chance. Ideally the first cast will land 2 feet in front of the leading fish in the skirmish line.  The natural tendency is to then reel fast through the school.  The better approach is to slow down realizing that small shad are not fast swimmers. Give the striper time to eat a shad and then come to find your larger lure that may be more enticing than the standard ¾ inch skinny shad.
What: Many differ small lures are working now but it may be that one lure worked great yesterday but not so good today. So be prepared. The list, in no particular order, includes size 65 lucky Craft ghost colored pointers, small Revenge spoons with chartreuse back,   small Kastmaster lures (1/4 to ½ ounce), other similar size spoons, low profile surface lures (Ima Skimmers),  small shad colored plastic grubs (1/8 ounce), crappie lures, swim baits, etc.  Really, any small lure will work at the right time.
Tips:  Retrieve the lure slow and steady through a surfacing school.
Immediately after a school leaves the surface, cast to the last known location and let the spoon or grub fall to a depth of 12-20 feet.  Then slowly retrieve the lure back toward the boat.  More than half the time the school of stripers will follow your lure.  Watch the zone at the edge of visibility (12 feet) to see the lure come back into view. When stripers are seen following, drop the lure out of sight then jig it a time or two to catch more fish.
Larger stripers cannot compete in the warm surface water with the small ones.  To target larger fish, troll or cast near main channel slick rock points with a 45 degree slope where bottom depth is 25 feet.  Bait is working for bigger fish in deeper. Catch rate is slower but size is significantly larger (4-6 pounds) for bait-caught fish.
By the way, smallmouth bass fishing remains extremely good on the same gently sloping slick rock walls of the main channel from Padre to Bullfrog.
The best bass experience is had by throwing surface lures to the recently covered weedy pockets near deep water at first light in the morning.  That where big largemouth bass are now lurking.
There is always a new adventure while fishing Lake Powell.


Lake Powell Fish Report – June 24, 2015

jeffknorrLake Elevation: 3611

Water Temperature 78 - 83 F

By: Wayne Gustaveson   http://www.wayneswords.com

Slurps, Slurps, Slurps!

Fishing is very exciting now with striped bass popping to the top over the length of the lake.  Catching is sometimes a different story so I am dedicating this report to help you catch more of the fish seen surfacing.

When:  Stripers are looking for three square meals a day. The only thing on the menu is small shad that live close to the surface while searching for plankton to eat.  The first daytime feeding event occurs at first light and lasts until the shade is gone.  The early morning feeding period can be cancelled if the morning breeze roughs up the water surface making it difficult for stripers to see the tiny shad in the rolling waves.

The next feeding period is from 9-11 AM (MST). If wind is a factor early then the combined first and second feeding period will begin as soon as the wind lays down allowing stripers to come up. 

The last surface feeding event begins at 4 PM (MST) and continues until dark.  This is the best and most consistent feeding period unless afternoon wind spoils the party.  

Where: Most of the action seen lately is in the main channel and main canyon areas in clear water. As water clarity improves in the next few weeks the northern lake will be the center of activity. Today the best area is from Bullfrog downstream to Padre Bay.  

How:  Slurps are quick but numerous. When the slurp erupts it is critical to quickly get in casting range.  How close is different for each individual depending on how far you can cast with your rod and the lure used.    Regardless of the distance when in range make the first cast count. There may not be time for a second chance. Ideally the first cast will land 2 feet in front of the leading fish in the skirmish line.  The natural tendency is to then reel fast through the school. The better approach is to slow down realizing that small shad are not fast swimmers. Give the striper time to eat a shad and then come to find your larger lure that may be more enticing than the standard ¾ inch skinny shad. 

rsoh-sch-thumbWhat: Many differ small lures are working now but it may be that one lure worked great yesterday but not so good today. So be prepared. The list, in no particular order, includes size 65 lucky Craft ghost colored pointers, small Revenge spoons with chartreuse back,  small Kastmaster lures (1/4 to ½ ounce), other similar size spoons, low profile surface lures (Ima Skimmers),  small shad colored plastic grubs (1/8 ounce), crappie lures, swim baits, etc.  Really, any small lure will work at the right time.

Tips:  Retrieve the lure slow and steady through a surfacing school.  Immediately after a school leaves the surface, cast to the last known location and let the spoon or grub fall to a depth of 12-20 feet.  Then slowly retrieve the lure back toward the boat.  More than half the time the school of stripers will follow your lure.  Watch the zone at the edge of visibility (12 feet) to see the lure come back into view. When stripers are seen following, drop the lure out of sight then jig it a time or two to catch more fish.   

Larger stripers cannot compete in the warm surface water with the small ones.  To target larger fish, troll or cast near main channel slick rock points with a 45 degree slope where bottom depth is 25 feet.  Bait is working for bigger fish in deeper water. Catch rate is slower but size is significantly larger (4-6 pounds) for bait-caught fish.   

By the way, smallmouth bass fishing remains extremely good on the same gently sloping slick rock walls of the main channel from Padre to Bullfrog.  

The best bass experience is had by throwing surface lures followed by senkos to the recently covered weedy pockets near deep water at first light in the morning.  That is where big largemouth bass are now lurking. 

There is always a new adventure while fishing Lake Powell.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 June 2015 08:36
 

June 17, 2015 - More subtle changes

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Lake Powell Fish Report – June 17, 2015
Lake Elevation: 3607
Water Temperature 77 - 80 F
By: Wayne Gustaveson   http://www.wayneswords.com
Subtle changes in fishing conditions continue. Here are some of the small events that may change your fishing adventure into a successful trip.
Stripers have now received that warm water spawning trigger and most have now spawned. Female stripers caught recently had no viable eggs left in the ovary. That is important because spawning occurs at night and daytime activity is very limited.  One successful report from last week indicated a good trolling pattern at night with stripers from 2-10 pounds caught. Trolling in the same area during the day did not produce any stripers. The good news is that post spawn stripers will be more active during daylight hours.  The bad news is the warmer temperatures that caused the spawn to occur will now hold mature fish in deeper water.
Striper fishing strategy for the coming week will be to target mature stripers in deep water using deep diving lures or down riggers to get trolled baits down to 25-35 feet where larger stripers are more comfortable in the warm water.  The best time of day (or night) will be the low light periods near dusk and dawn.  Afternoon and evening fishing will be best with some late spawners still holding off and maintaining the nocturnal behavior pattern.
While adults have been waiting around to spawn, juvenile stripers have been lighting up the surface while slurping up tiny larval shad.  Slurps are most common early in the morning when the wind does not blow.  If wind is a factor then expect slurpers to pop up as soon as the lake calms down mid morning.  Still the most productive time is afternoon and evening beginning at 4 PM.
Slurps this week were short lived. I suspect the cause is that shad numbers are small.  Shad spawned recently are being quickly consumed and survivors are running toward weedy cover to escape relentless pursuit from small stripers. The end result is a slurp that is seen but not accessible due to the short time it is on the surface.
It is possible to use this behavior to locate larger stripers. Target slurps that are seen near shore. Approach the spot where slurping fish were seen, then fish on the bottom with small white plastic or bucktail jigs to target larger stripers.  Adult stripers are well aware of any school feeding behavior that occurs nearby.  Use that behavior to put a lure into cooler water where adults are forced to hold due to water temperature.  This was our best technique to find larger stripers on our weekly sampling trip.
Our trip was saved by the very cooperative smallmouth bass that were on fire on open water reefs and slick rock points and coves.  We caught numerous bass up to 2-pounds casting to the shore with small single and double tail plastic grubs, and rattletrap type crankbaits. Best lure colors were white and chartreuse. The best pattern was to find a slick rock point or shelf within a cove where water dropped off quickly into deep water. Starting depth was 12 feet with good bass action continuing all the way down to 30 feet. Bass turned on at 10 AM and continued until we had to leave to go back down lake at noon.
Here is a tip for smallmouth bass that bite a bit short and often are felt but not hooked. As soon as the bite occurs or the bass comes off the hook while reeling in, open the bail and drop the bait to the bottom.  When the bait hits bottom take up the slack and set the hook. It is the nature of smallmouth bass to follow the bait they have “wounded” and then pick it up again off the bottom. Knowing that, it is possible to set the hook and catch the fish without feeling the pickup.
Try this technique and let me know if it works for you.

Lake Powell Fish Report – June 17, 2015

Lake Elevation: 3607

Water Temperature 77 - 80 F

By: Wayne Gustaveson   http://www.wayneswords.com


zanewaedarkSubtle changes in fishing conditions continue. Here are some of the small events that may change your fishing adventure into a successful trip. 

Stripers have now received that warm water spawning trigger and most have now spawned. Female stripers caught recently had no viable eggs left in the ovary. That is important because spawning occurs at night and daytime activity is very limited.  One successful report from last week indicated a good trolling pattern at night with stripers from 2-10 pounds caught. Trolling in the same area during the day did not produce any stripers. The good news is that post spawn stripers will be more active during daylight hours.  The bad news is the warmer temperatures that caused the spawn to occur will now hold mature fish in deeper water.

Striper fishing strategy for the coming week will be to target mature stripers in deep water using deep diving lures or down riggers to get trolled baits down to 25-35 feet where larger stripers are more comfortable in cooler water.  The best time of day (or night) will be the low light periods near dusk and dawn.  Afternoon and evening fishing will be best with some late spawners still holding off and maintaining the nocturnal behavior pattern.  

While adults have been waiting around to spawn, juvenile stripers have been lighting up the surface while slurping up tiny larval shad.  Slurps are most common early in the morning when the wind does not blow.  If wind is a factor then expect slurpers to pop up as soon as the lake calms down mid morning.  Still the most productive time is afternoon and evening beginning at 4 PM. 

Slurps this week were short lived. I suspect the cause is that shad numbers are small.  Shad spawned recently are being quickly consumed and survivors are running toward weedy cover to escape relentless pursuit from small stripers. The end result is a slurp that is seen but not accessible due to the short time it is on the surface.  

It is possible to use this behavior to locate larger stripers. Target slurps that are seen near shore. Approach the spot where slurping fish were seen, then fish on the bottom with small white plastic or bucktail jigs to target larger stripers.  Adult stripers are well aware of any school feeding behavior that occurs nearby.  Use that behavior to put a lure into cooler water where adults are forced to hold due to water temperature.  This was our best technique to find larger stripers on our weekly sampling trip. 

zanetripbassOur trip was saved by the very cooperative smallmouth bass that were on fire on open water reefs and slick rock points and coves.  We caught numerous bass up to 2-pounds casting to the shore with small single and double tail plastic grubs, and rattletrap type crankbaits. Best lure colors were white and chartreuse. The best pattern was to find a slick rock point or shelf within a cove where water dropped off quickly into deep water. Starting depth was 12 feet with good bass action continuing all the way down to 30 feet. Bass turned on at 10 AM and continued until we had to leave to go back down lake at noon.  

We also caught one obligatory walleye in the process.

Here is a tip for smallmouth bass that bite a bit short and often are felt but not hooked. As soon as the bite occurs or the bass comes off the hook while reeling in, open the bail and drop the bait to the bottom.  When the bait hits bottom take up the slack and set the hook. It is the nature of smallmouth bass to follow the bait they have “wounded” and then pick it up again off the bottom. Knowing that, it is possible to set the hook and catch the fish without feeling the pickup.  

Try this technique and let me know if it works for you.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 17 June 2015 08:42
 

June 10, 2015 - Striper Feeding Pattern

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Lake Powell Fish Report – June 10, 2015
Lake Elevation: 3562
Water Temperature 71 - 75 F
By: Wayne Gustaveson   http://www.wayneswords.com
The unusual year of fisheries expectations continues.  The big news is that striped bass females caught yesterday still have not spawned.  That should not be too surprising since the daytime temperatures and weather resemble late April more than early June.  It is raining and cool today as this report is written. Female stripers need the trigger of rapidly warming water before they will spawn. If daytime air temperature warms up to normal any time soon then the wait for spawning will be over.
The next surprise was being able to catch ripe females.  They have been hiding out all spring and not eating while sulking on the lake bottom.  We have done strange things to find catchable fish like trolling flies to select shallow plankton-eating ripe males.   On this trip we could not catch male stripers and found most of the fish caught were females. Why the change? Why are fish that were not eating suddenly participating?  That is enough biological intrigue for now as we focus on how to catch cooperating stripers.
At first light we searched for slurping stripers in the main channel.  We found them at the mouth of Warm Creek, mouth of Gunsight, and West Canyon. The negative part was that they were skittish and hard to approach.  The only working method was to cast a small Kastmaster to the location where the school sounded and let the spoon sink.  Then we could reel the spoon slowly and catch a few yearling  stripers at a depth of about 12 feet.
Our attitude changed dramatically in the main channel as the sun hit the water at the mouth of Last Chance where the slurpers were 2-3 pound fish.  These stripers were very cooperative taking lures and spoons that hit close to the slurping epicenter. We put 8 of these nice fish in the cooler before the school escaped to the depths.
Boils are great but not always available.  Here is the pattern that consistently worked the rest of the day. The holding depth of stripers actively feeding has been 25 feet all spring. Lately slick rock habitat has been used more than broken rock. We targeted main channel and main canyon cliffs looking for an isolated shallow bench in otherwise deep water. Slick rock points were the key. Find a shallow point along the canyon walls where shallow water provides a refuge for bait fish and crayfish and stripers will be close by.    We targeted stripers by trolling over the shallow point along the 25 foot depth contour.  Our best lure was the Luck Craft Bevy Shad in chartreuse shad color. When a striper was hooked trolling we switched over to Kastmaster spoons to catch more fish off the bottom in a hurry. Sometimes just casting the trolling lure worked as well if the trailing fish were high up in the water column. At the end of the day trolling and casting accounted for the majority of the 34 stripers caught.
As we worked back downlake we asked other anglers for their fish reports. We found a group with a cooler full of stripers that were caught on anchovies. The habitat type they were fishing was a 30-foot slick rock bench at the mouth of a canyon surrounded by deep water.  The habitat type is key to finding feeding stripers. Then they can be caught using techniques of your choosing.
We picked up active smallmouth bass while trolling/casting for stripers.  They are feeding in the same 25-30 foot zone as striped bass.  We did not catch walleye that prefer shallower water now that some shoreline vegetation has been inundated by rising water. Look for a bluegill school in the brush to know where walleye will be lurking in slightly deeper water.
Rising water, cool temperatures, brush in the water, spawning fish all make for a challenging but very rewarding fishing experience in Lake Powell in early June.

lctrip1





Lake Powell Fish Report – June 10, 2015

Lake Elevation: 3602

Water Temperature 71 - 75 F

By: Wayne Gustaveson   http://www.wayneswords.com


The unusual year of fisheries expectations continues.  The big news is that striped bass females caught yesterday still have not spawned.  That should not be too surprising since the daytime temperatures and weather resemble late April more than early June.  It is raining and cool today as this report is written. Female stripers need the trigger of rapidly warming water before they will spawn. If daytime air temperature warms up to normal any time soon then the wait for spawning will be over.

lctripnobThe next surprise was being able to catch ripe females.  They have been hiding out all spring and not eating while sulking on the lake bottom.  We have done strange things to find catchable fish like trolling flies to select shallow plankton-eating ripe males.   On this trip we could not catch male stripers and found most of the fish caught were females. Why the change? Why are fish that were not eating suddenly participating?  That is enough biological intrigue for now as we focus on how to catch cooperating stripers.   

At first light we searched for slurping stripers in the main channel.  We found them at the mouth of Warm Creek, mouth of Gunsight, and West Canyon. The negative part was that they were skittish and hard to approach.  The only working method was to cast a small Kastmaster to the location where the school sounded and let the spoon sink.  Then we could reel the spoon slowly and catch a few yearling  stripers at a depth of about 12 feet. 

Our attitude changed dramatically in the main channel as the sun hit the water at the mouth of Last Chance where the slurpers were 2-3 pound fish.  These stripers were very cooperative taking lures and spoons that hit close to the slurping epicenter. We put 8 of these nice fish in the cooler before the school escaped to the depths.

Boils are great but not always available.  Here is the pattern that consistently worked the rest of the day. The holding depth of stripers actively feeding has been 25 feet all spring. Lately slick rock habitat has been used more than broken rock. We targeted main channel and main canyon cliffs looking for an isolated shallow bench in otherwise deep water. Slick rock points were the key. Find a shallow point along the canyon walls where shallow water provides a refuge for bait fish and crayfish and stripers will be close by.    We targeted stripers by trolling over the shallow point along the 25 foot depth contour.  Our best lure was the Lucky Craft Bevy Shad in chartreuse shad color. When a striper was hooked trolling we switched over to Kastmaster spoons to catch more fish off the bottom in a hurry. Sometimes just casting the trolling lure worked as well if the trailing fish were high up in the water column. At the end of the day trolling and casting accounted for the majority of the 34 stripers caught.    

As we worked back downlake we asked other anglers for their fish reports. We found a group with a cooler full of stripers that were caught on anchovies. The habitat type they were fishing was a 30-foot slick rock bench at the mouth of a canyon surrounded by deep water.  The habitat type is key to finding feeding stripers. Then they can be caught using techniques of your choosing.  

We picked up active smallmouth bass while trolling/casting for stripers.  They are feeding in the same 25-30 foot zone as striped bass.  We did not catch walleye that prefer shallower water now that some shoreline vegetation has been inundated by rising water. Look for a bluegill school in the brush to know where walleye will be lurking in slightly deeper water.

Rising water, cool temperatures, brush in the water, spawning fish all make for a challenging but very rewarding fishing experience in Lake Powell in early June.

This is not a scenery shot but the slick rock point habitat that can be seen a long way off. Striper are holding on the 25-30 foot bottom depth area where they find a few small fish but also plankton and larval shad schools.  Look for Slick Rock points to improve fishing success. 

lctrip2

Last Updated on Wednesday, 10 June 2015 09:09
 

June 2, 2015 - Slurps begin!

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Lake Powell Fish Report – June 2, 2015
Lake Elevation: 3597.6
Water Temperature 70 - 75 F
By: Wayne Gustaveson   http://www.wayneswords.com
Slurps!
The fishing report trip this week got off to a weird start.  We wanted to get out early to counter the sometimes negative effect of full moon on fish behavior.  The moon was bright when we launched at Wahweap and headed straight for Castle Rock to look for fly-eating stripers. My trolled fly went unpunished but my partner’s Lucky Craft Bevy Shad was eaten by a striper.  That was the exact opposite response found using the same techniques at the same spot last week.  We tried one more pass and this time the Bevy was eaten by a walleye.
Walleye fishing is best in low light of early morning.  Walleye catch uplake is greater and more prolonged in the murky water near the mouth of Red Canyon. Some anglers report catching more than 30 walleye a day, fast trolling with Mann’s Red Craw deep divers. Other anglers are dragging night crawlers along the bottom and catching many walleye.  No matter what technique is used, walleye fishing is much better in the northern lake.
Since flies were not working we headed uplake through the Castle Rock Cut. As we idled through the Cut I put out my Helsinki Shad colored Shad Rap and caught the biggest striper of the day.  Later we found that the big fish had two large threadfin shad in the stomach. Shad are using the Cut for migration or hiding spots from lake predators. I don’t recommend trolling there unless there is no other boat traffic. It should work fine to troll there between 4 and 5 AM.
The next stop was Buoy 25 and 25B where stripers had been caught trolling last week. It seems moon effect and/or warming water were in play as fishing was not as productive along the slick rock points and reefs as it was just a few days ago. We did catch a few stripers trolling along the shade line in deep water.  But fishing was too slow so we went uplake.
The next stop was the mouth of West Canyon.  We tried fly trolling without success. We did catch smallmouth when near a shallow reef or when we ventured too close to the shore. After giving up on flies we looked for a new pattern.  There was an open water reef that was similar to the reef in Wahweap Bay that had been hot last week.  We trolled Bevy Shad lures along the reef edge.  The secret was to find the narrow 25 foot depth zone on the breaking edge of the reef. If we kept the boat and lures over that depth zone, stripers would find our lures.  That worked well as we caught stripers and bass on consecutive passes.
That would have been a fitting way to end the day but we got an added bonus.  As we were playing a troll caught fish, yearling stripers began boiling around the boat. We added another 6 fish to the cooler by casting small Hyper Stripers and Lucky Craft Pointers to the hungry stripers.  The boil came up 4 times before they stayed down and we headed for home.
As we passed through Padre Bay we tried the spot where fly fishing had been so good the week before.  Again flies did not work.  We did graph a huge striper school on the same shallow bench where they were previously caught. One ripe male was caught at 35 feet on a spoon but most of our offerings were ignored. My guess is that these fish have not yet completed spawning and they are still in the night activity mode. The warmer water may be keeping them deeper and preventing fly trolling from working as well as it did previously.
That is the excitement of fishing at Lake Powell. There is always a different technique or location that may turn a mundane outing into a successful fishing trip.

Lake Powell Fish Report – June 2, 2015

Lake Elevation: 3597.6

Water Temperature 70 - 75 F

By: Wayne Gustaveson   http://www.wayneswords.com

Slurps!

The fishing report trip this week got off to a weird start.  We wanted to get out early to counter the sometimes negative effect of full moon on fish behavior.  The moon was bright when we launched at Wahweap and headed straight for Castle Rock to look for fly-eating stripers. My trolled fly went unpunished but my partner’s Lucky Craft Bevy Shad was eaten by a striper.  That was the exact opposite response found using the same techniques at the same spot last week.  We tried one more pass and this time the Bevy was eaten by a walleye.

waessWalleye fishing is best in low light of early morning.  Walleye catch uplake is greater and more prolonged in the murky water near the mouth of Red Canyon. Some anglers report catching more than 30 walleye a day, fast trolling with Mann’s Red Craw deep divers. Other anglers are dragging night crawlers slowly along the bottom and catching many walleye.  No matter what technique is used, walleye fishing is much better in the northern lake. 

Since flies were not working we headed uplake through the Castle Rock Cut. As we idled through the Cut I put out my Helsinki Shad colored Shad Rap and caught the biggest striper of the day.  Later we found that the big fish had two large (6 inch) threadfin shad in the stomach. Shad are using the Cut for migration or hiding spots from lake predators. I don’t recommend trolling there unless there is no other boat traffic. It should work fine to troll there between 4 and 5 AM. 

The next stop was Buoy 25 and 25B where stripers had been caught trolling last week. It seems moon effect and/or warming water were in play as fishing was not as productive along the slick rock points and reefs as it was just a few days ago. We did catch a few stripers trolling along the shade line in deep water.  But fishing was too slow so we went uplake.  

The next stop was the mouth of West Canyon.  We tried fly trolling without success. We did catch smallmouth when near a shallow reef or when we ventured too close to the shore. After giving up on flies we looked for a new pattern.  There was an open water reef that was similar to the reef in Wahweap Bay that had been hot last week.  We trolled Bevy Shad lures along the reef edge.  The secret was to find the narrow 25 foot depth zone on the breaking edge of the reef. If we kept the boat and lures over that depth zone, stripers would find our lures.  That worked well as we caught many stripers and bass on consecutive passes. 

slurps622cThat would have been a fitting way to end the day but we got an added bonus.  As we were playing a troll caught fish, yearling stripers began boiling around the boat. We added another 6 fish to the cooler by casting small Hyper Stripers and Lucky Craft Pointers to the hungry stripers.  The boil came up 4 times before they stayed down and we headed for home. 

As we passed through Padre Bay we tried the spot where fly fishing had been so good the week before.  Again flies did not work.  We did graph a huge striper school on the same shallow bench where they were previously caught. One ripe male was caught at 35 feet on a spoon but most of our offerings were ignored. My guess is that these fish have not yet completed spawning and they are still in the night activity mode. The warmer water may be keeping them deeper and preventing fly trolling from working as well as it did previously.

That is the excitement of fishing at Lake Powell. There is always a different technique or location that may turn a mundane outing into a successful fishing trip.

 
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